Ben Krueger is the owner of Authority Engine and is an avid podcaster. His company specializes in helping people start podcasts and other podcast related trainings. He talks to Jason on some very helpful podcast marketing tips to better utilize your audience and how you can build stronger relationships with your listeners.

Key Takeaways:

[2:30] Podcasting allows you to create content in a very easy way and it builds relationships.

[5:20] Can podcasting work for the local provider? The dentist, chiropractor, etc?

[9:45] Don’t be afraid to turn some people off.

[14:15] Develop a podcast the way you’d develop any friendship.

[16:25] Ben shares direct response marketing tips to convert listeners into potential customers.

[22:10] Jason loves Tucker Max’s show notes.

[29:00] Podcast between 17-22 minutes long works really well for listeners.

Mentioned In This Episode:

Influence by Robert Cialdini

Auphonic.com

Audio-Technica ATR2100 Microphone.

Skype Call Recorder

Pamela

AuthorityEngine.com

Tweetables:

Develop a podcast the way you develop any friendship.

One of the things that gets butchered by podcasters is that at the end they’ve got like 7 calls to action.

Auphonic is like a poor man’s way to do editing.

Transcript

Jason Hartman:

Hey, it’s my pleasure to welcome Ben Krueger to the show. He is the founder of Authority Engine and he teaches podcaster how to record, engage, and convert their listeners into income and it’s a pleasure to have him coming to us today from Columbus, Ohio. Ben, welcome, how are you?

Ben Krueger:

I’m fantastic, Jason. I am exicted for having me on the show and always excited to talk a little of podcasting shops. So, looking forward to rolling up my sleeps and getting in here.

Jason:

Well, this is a subject near and dear to my hear, just to tell you a little bit of my story, I started podcasting in the olden days back in 2007, you know? The old days. I am a dinosaur.

Ben:

The stone ages of podcasting.

Jason:

That’s right, that’s right. So, I hope you can teach me and our listeners some of the most contemporary cutting edge ideas today and I think you can. You know, first of all, let’s talk about maybe just briefly on the market, you know, if someone isn’t podcasting now why they should consider it. If they are, how they can improve it.

Ben:

Absolutely, Jason. So, you know, we were talking a little bit here before we hit the old record button about kind of the whole purpose of podcasting, so if you are a, let’s say you’re a business owner, especially if you are a solopreneur or a personality-based entrepreneur whether that’s a coach or consultant or author or you run a membership site or something to where it’s based off of your personality and your authority in this space, podcasting could be a really great option for you, because what the whole goal of podcasting is and what allows you to achieve as a host is it allows you to create content in a very easy and effective way, it allows you to build relationships and network in an industry that makes it so much easier than it was previous. It gives you a very good excuse to reach out to people who may be big influences and movers and shakers in a way that’s going to actually help them as well as help you.

Jason:

You nailed that one, Ben. It’s a great quid pro quo exchange, you  know. You have your various guests on the show, you get to learn a lot from them, they get exposure, and everybody wins. It’s just a great relationship, great dynamic.

Ben:

It’s so fantastic and it allows you to open that door to where you can create a long term relationship with those people, which is really where long term success is going to come from is kind of that network you’re able to build and the trust and kind of good will that you’re able to build in an industry to where the industry supports you and you’re not scraping and crawling your way from the bottom every step.

Jason:

Yeah, no question. So, I definitely agree with you that a personality-based entrepreneur, that’s a no-brainier. I like how you call it. I call it personal branding or personally branded entrepreneur, but a personality-based entrepreneur, same difference pretty much and they definitely can use it and I think they can probably see that. If they can’t, they probably shouldn’t be in the business they’re in, but what about some of the ancillary industries and, you know, our show mostly focuses on speakers, authors, coaches, you know, things like that, so all of those personality-based entrepreneur, but you know, I always wondered how effective maybe a local brick and mortar store or retailer or service provider could be with a podcast.

Many years ago, just to give a comparison, there was a big push to make the internet local. You know, 10-12 years ago, the internet was not local. Like, if you wanted to find out where to get your haircut or where to get your massage or where to get your tires changed in your car, the internet was useless, I mean, it really was in the old days, but Google probably lead that charge and they really focused on this hyper local internet and now we all use and enjoy that. We can just whip out our smartphones, we can use Google maps and say we wanna find someone who does this, where’s the coffee shop, you know, and you can find it. I’ve always sort of wondered if podcasting works for that person, that company.

Ben:

You know, I think it’s shifting that way, because kind of like you were describing Google was in the old days. It was a little bit more broad and general topic and a little bit less location specific and podcasting, since it doesn’t need to be location specific can be very broad, it can be world wide, it can be nationwide, it can be a lot of those thing. It doesn’t have to be local. However, I think just like since blogging has been around for a long time as all of the big picture categories kind of get filled up with people who are really providing value there.

People are looking for very specific things, then those, as the need for those shows arises, then kind of the provider shows up when the need, kind of, you know, it’s very capitalist kind of view that I am taking here, but with podcasting specifically, I’ve seen local brick and mortar business do incredibly well, especially in industries to where they can have a very avid, active, and engaged followership. So, things like, you know, Spartan races and some of those Warrior Dash and aggressive type of races to where they might have one in a local area, things like cross-fit. I’m really getting into the fitness industry here, apparently.

Jason:

Right, but that is a good one, because they have sort of that kind of groupie mentality, so I think you picked a good one there.

Ben:

Yeah, very much like, you know, I’ll drop the C-word, the cult, kind of the cultist mentality of very positive and engaging community that builds off of each other, so that’s where, especially if you’ve got a product or service or you’ve got a local store that really is a passion for people and not just used electronics or something like that, but if you’ve got a store that’s a passion for people and you’ve got a local group that could be or that is already interested in that, especially if there’s, you know, some kind of local community meet up group or something like that, you know, I’ve seen that be a really great hot bed to launch local podcasts.

Jason:

Okay, I didn’t mean to get off on that tangent too much, but I always wondered if it could work for the local chiropractor or the local whatever. That’s interesting what you said. I think that the thing is you have to have those groupies, you have to have that in a positive way, cult potential and that’s when a podcast can really work even if it’s hyper local. So, great points, great points. Let’s go back a step to kind of a broader areas of podcasting and talk about those now that we covered that local thing that was probably bit of a tangent.

Ben:

That’s okay. You get me talking about podcasting, we’ll cover lots of tangents.

Jason:

Oh, man, I could talk forever, I love this stuff.

Ben:

So, I think the biggest thing here as far as when it comes to broad podcasting, so we talked about, you know, if you’re a personality-based business or a personal brand how you’re able to use it as a networking tool. You’re also able to use it as positioning tool to set yourself in a way in a market to best serve that, so if you want to be the hard-nose no BS kind of an expert or if you wanna be the go-to authority or if you want to be the reporter that’s bringing you interviews and information from these types of people.

There’s a lot of different ways you can position yourself based off your own goals and your own goals with your business and how you see that podcast fitting in. So, that’s one thing I really stress. A lot of people think about is how do you want to be viewed by your audience and your kind of target listenership that is going to hopefully, eventually turn into a paying customer for you and how are you viewed in that scheme. So, that’s a lot of stuff there.

Jason:

yeah, you made a great point. Do you want to be viewed as the hard-nosed person, like maybe you’re a lawyer and that’s perfect for that, you know, character type and I agree with you and I think one thing that podcasters should not be afraid of, in fact, they should really embrace it is they should not be afraid of being controversial. They should not be afraid of turning some people off and making some people upset with them.

If you look at some of the most famous broadcasters and, you know, Rush Limbaugh comes to mind, Howard Stern comes to mind, you know, they repulse half of the people and the other half just love them. I think people a lot of times, they might get started in podcasting and they’re not, oh my god, I got a bad review or someone wrote me hate me, you know, you should embrace that! Sometimes, maybe not always, but you know, with good judgment obviously. Thoughts?

Ben:

Definitely. If you’re not pissing some people off, you’re doing something wrong, at least that’s my approach and it’s because of what you said. If you have a strong opinion about something, it’s going to naturally separate the audience or separate the waters, but in a way that’s really positive for you, because it’s going to naturally weed out the people who you don’t really want to be working with or build a long term relationship with, but then those who do agree with you are at least can kind of see those view points; that’s going to build a much deeper personal connection with them, because they’re going to feel a stronger relation to you and kind of you being able to share that strong opinion and so that ability to build that longer term relationship and a deeper relationship is why people like Rush Limbaugh and some of those Howard Sterns have such a really aggressive following of people that absolutely love their stuff. It’s because they have an opinion and they’re willing to share it and they’re not hiding it.

Jason:

Good point. Okay, so what are some of the steps that people should take, let’s assume that people are already podcasting, how can they level up? How can they do it better than what they’re doing?

Ben:

Definitely, definitely. We were actually talking about this as well is to think of podcasting as part of your sales funnel, as part of your discovery and lead creation funnel here, because what podcasting is great for getting discovered, but also great for building those long term relationships and a lot of people only focus on the discovery piece and kind of forget the last part.

So, what I like to kind of analogize here, if that’s a word or I am making stuff up here, is when somebody comes and discovers you and your expertise and maybe you’re talking about a certain topic and you’ve got some products and services that help out with that on the back end. They may not be at the point in the buying cycle to where they need to purchase something right at that point when they discover you, but because they have gotten a lot of value from you from your podcast, they really enjoy and like who you are as a person from listening to your show and they, after listening for a while, know that you as a host know what you’re talking about and as a service provider know what you’re talking about.

When they do come to that point in the buying cycle to where they’re read to purchase, it only makes sense that they’re coming to you, because you’ve already built that know, like, trust factor and the way to do this is to think of it much like you would a normal autoresponder or a normal funnel type of an approach is when people discover you and I like to kind of integrate it into my email autoresponder sequence in my initial emails to kind of build a relationship and warm up people, is I tie in some of my older, more popular episodes that got the most likes, shares, comments, whatever, and say, oh by the way, we’ve got this podcast going and I think you should check it out. This one is particularly helpful if you have a challenge with x.

So, you give them a link to check it out and every once in a while you tie back into some of that content giving them very specific episodes that help them solve very specific problems and that in of itself is a great way to kind of help them discover your show and get a contentious exposure so that they can kind of sink their teeth in and really get to enjoy what it is that you offer on a long term basis.

Jason:

You know, the great thing is, I mean, you said treat it like an autoresponder. Internet marketers out there, they use these drip series of emails and they have a drip series of 18 emails for that and another drip for this other thing depending on how they came into one’s funnel and I just want to stress to people how much simpler podcasting is. I wouldn’t call it a drip, Ben, I would call it, just, a friendship, you know, or a relationship.

I mean, develop this the way you develop any friendship. You go down this path, you share more, you share more about yourself, not just, you know, with your guest and kind of the business side, but you know, opening up a little bit to your audience I think is a good thing. I think they’ll appreciate the humanity. Don’t forget there should be some humanity. You just develop that relationship so they know, like, an trust you, and you’re just the logical choice. I mean, who else would they go to, you know? They haven’t been listening to someone else’s podcast. They haven’t had this long term, you know, counseling or contribution from anybody else probably, so of course they’re going to call you when they need your product or service.

Ben:

Absolutely. I mean, they’ve already been coming to you for advice, so it only makes sense for them to then if you’ve got something that will help them take that next step they’re looking for, of course, they’ll get out the check book, it makes sense.

Jason:

Robert Cialdini wrote that very famous best selling book we all know about called Influence and one of the things he talks about is the law of reciprocity. So as a podcaster, I think you really go to get into like a giving mode, not view podcasting as a transactional relationship as so many people do in the world and especially so many internet marketers where, you know, you’re going to do this, you’re going to expect direct response. It doesn’t really, at least for me, work that way with podcasting. You just put a lot out there, you give a lot away, and it just comes back to with the old biblical law, the ten fold return.

Ben:

There are ways to try to drive some direct response and that kind of thing, but like you were saying and I agree with you wholeheartedly that the true value in podcasting is that long-term relationship building and getting to know them, you know, the know, like, trust factor, and the fact that you can drive emails sign ups and the fact that you can get some of those more immediate direct response steps is a little bit like icing on the cake.

Jason:

Well, you know, I would love, even though we said all of that about building relationships, if you would share. Ben, one or two direct response tips for podcasters, because I could use them and I’m sure our listeners could too.

Ben:

Absolutely, absolutely. So, this is one that I’m really excited about and it’s getting big, big results and podcast marketing right now.

Jason:

I’m taking notes.

Ben:

Yeah, you know, brush off the dust off your pens here. If you take, let’s say you record a podcast, like this episode and afterwards what we’ve started doing is creating a very simple PDF guide for every podcast episode that we create, because for my show particularly, it’s very actionable, so we kind of boil down what we talked about in that episode into here’s the exact action steps you need to achieve X results or to do this or do that. What we do is we put it in the show notes behind an opt-in wall, so we just use like lead pages or a lead box and then at the end of the episode, what you can do is a simple call to action.

This is one of the things that I see get butchered most often by podcasters is that at the end they’ve got like seven calls to action, you know, rate, reviews, subscribe us on iTunes and check out the site and then check out the show notes an all this stuff and what you want to have instead is one to two very simple and clear calls to action so, specifically, the two that I really like and have found work really well is have a call to action for some sort of a an episode specific giveaway.

So, whether that’s a PDF guide like I talked about, whether that’s a full transcription of the episode, maybe it’s screen shots of something that you guys discussed or case studies or something like that. It depends on the topic of your podcast, but have something that you can give away that’s really valuable to the listener based off of that episode’s content as an opt-in give away and put it in the show notes page and that should be one call to action.

So, after this episode we’re going to create a guide that’s going to lay out the five steps to getting started with podcasting and you can check it out here at this link. The other call to action that I generally use is another opt-in call to action, which is the main opt-in giveaway that you have on your home page and that is something that is kind of always that first step that somebody needs to take to see some results within your industry and within what your podcasting about, which is typically a really, really great value give away for an opt-in.

So, when you’re able to capture somebody’s email address, then you’re able to market to them in a much more kind of one-to-one way as oppose to with podcasting, it is kind of that more long term relationship building tool. It’s a little bi more difficult to get those direct calls to action or, you know, it’s a little bit harder to say, hey, we’re launching this new podcast, you could check it out over here where as, you know, this new product or this new whatever whereas email it’s much, much easier and you can give them a direct link.

Jason:

Good stuff. I think what we need to do Ben is people listening need to think of this as like a reverse funnel, if you will. Most marketers and I know I keep saying internet marketers, because it’s unique type of marketing, okay, but you know, every business should be and internet marketing rolled in some way or another nowadays. You know, it’s almost flipping the funnel upside down. You start with a podcast, you start with giving a lot of value away for free. You start with building that relationship and then you flip it upside down, you collect email addresses and then you engage in marketing. So, it’s sort of like a reverse funnel, would you agree or?

Ben:

I think instead of a reverse funnel, I kind of more think of it as like, it’s a little bit of a cart before the house then it’s kind like a bump in the road or the snake just swallowed a wallaby, you know? Because you got the value giveaway at the very beginning, which is the podcast or with any of your other marketing piece, then you’ve got the valuable giveaway for an opt-in in exchanged for an opt-in or their email address and then you’ve got to where you continue to value or offer value to them by tying it back into podcast episodes, tying it back into other content pieces, tying it back into whatever else you’re doing with your brand and your funnel, and then obviously will eventually in some way lead to a way that somebody can purchase or buy something from you that’s going to help them achieve a certain result.

Jason:

Good, good stuff. Okay, so when you talk, you talked about the two things and the one that you mentioned is like a guide. I’ve been transcribing my podcasts for many, many years and, by the way, I’ve spent a small fortune on that, not that it’s not more than worth it, but..

Ben:

It’s pretty expensive.

Jason:

It is, it is pretty expensive to do, you know, good quality transactions and even then, there’s lots of mistake, but what is a guide? I mean, speak a little bit more about that and before you answer, Ben. I’ll tell you something that I started implementing about three months ago, maybe, and I got the idea actually from Tucker Max, the infamous Tucker Max. Talk about someone people love or hate.

Ben:

Yeah, no joke.

Jason:

There’s a great example right? I kind of feel like he started a podcast and I kind of feel like he’s trying to reform his image a little a bit. It’s just my personal opinion and can be considered a little more seriously as he’s getting a little older now and he’s viewing his life differently possibly, but what’s interesting is he is doing a great job with something I call in enhanced transcriptions and instead of just having a transcript of the show where it’s like Jason said this, Ben said that, you know, that’s fine and dandy. It’s got key takeaways, it’s got time codes, it’s got resources to links, you know, different websites mentioned and so forth and I thought that was really good and we started doing that a few months ago and I haven’t really had any feedback on it from listeners, unfortunately. I wish I could share and say, hey, they all love it, but I love it, and I think it really is, you know, leveling up a bit. What do you mean by a guide though? What is a guide as a direct response hook?

Ben:

Yeah, when I use the term guide all I’m referring to is essentially what we do instead of transcribing and then taking the transcription and putting then the key takeaways and stuff like that. What I’ll do is I’ll take that episode and I’ll boil down the concepts into a one to two page PDF that really lays out, here’s the action steps that you can take without a whole bunch of fluff on either end. It doesn’t have, you know a lot of ebooks or books, the first 50 pages introduce the book, the last 50 pages wrap up the book and then, you know.

Jason:

It’s such a waste of time.

Ben:

Oh my gosh, yeah. The middle ten pages where you’re like finally, get something out of here. So, what I try to do is take everything that’s there and think about, at it’s essence, here’s the information that you need from this and here’s links to all the tools, resources, whatever that you need to do it, and it’s all going to be in a one to two page guide and it’s going to have a nice little, you know, our little logo in the top corner and maybe some social sharing buttons at the bottom and it’s very, very simple.

Jason:

So, with that, are you doing that yourself or do you have a virtual worker doing that?

Ben:

Yeah, we have right now my team member is doing that, but it’s something that, especially if you’re getting started by yourself, it doesn’t have to be fancy. A lot of people will get caught up in like, oh, this will take forever, well, if you’re writing show notes, you’re already writing a decent portion of it and you can take what you’ve got in your show notes, boil that down into some action steps, put it behind an email opt-in wall and you’re good to go.

Jason:

Okay, good, good. Alright, what else do you want people to know?

Ben:

So, the other thing that I really like about podcasting particularly as a small business owner or solopreneur, and individual brand, if you will, is that it allows you to leverage some of that kind of relationship building with some media opportunities as well. So, when I mean by that, let’s say, you bring on somebody on your show that you’re excited about. They are relatively big names in the industry and you have a really great interview, then what you can do is you can take that interview and  approach different media outlets or higher level blogs in your space or other podcasts, but typically either blogs or, you know, online media type of sites, and offer to write an article for them, shoot them an email, and offer to write an article for them and you can tie it back into this interview you did, because the name of the person you interviewed can bring a lot of weight with it. So, let’s say I interviewed Cliff Ravenscraft, who is a big name in podcasting.

Jason:

Yep, he’s been on the show.

Ben:

Yeah, exactly, and I wanted to get a TechCrunch article or something like that. I can shoot him a quick email and say, hey, so, wanted to offer to – I’ve actually already written up a 600 word article based off of the interview that I did with Cliff where he revealed his thoughts on where the podcast industry is going and what that means for small business owners or what that means for the tech community and how we need to prepare for that going forward.

If you like me to send over that draft, let me know, or shoot me a quick reply, and it’s an easier foot in the door with some of these media avenues, because you can leverage the weight that some of these names carry with them as oppose to you just going there and saying, hey, I can write you guys an article.

Jason:

Yeah, that’s true. I agree with you, but how do you, you know, one of the things I don’t like about podcasting and there’s very little I don’t like about it, because I get to talk to smart people all day and that’s really interesting. I get to learn new things, share them with people. A lot of times I don’t do the guest format, I just do a monologue format and it’ll just be me talking and, you know, I’ll think, gosh, how am I going to talk about this for more than five minutes and then 30 minutes later and I’m not just wasting their time, you know, just when you start you think of other related aspects.

One of the things I don’t like about it is sort of the lack of portability, if you will, where as, you know, you can send someone an article or a blog post and then can just skim in. With a podcast, it’s like, oh, I got to listen to it and it’s going to take time and there’s sort of a barrier there, you know what I mean?

Ben:

Absolutely, absolutely. I’ve got a thought on this if we can run with this for a sec.

Jason:

Yeah, go for it. I think, this is an important thing because this speaks to the, I’m going to call it, the portability and sharability and virality of podcasting.

Ben:

Yeah, I agree wholeheartedly. So, I think there’s a little bit of a trend going on in podcasting, because what you said is, you know, if you’re going to listen to an episode, you pretty much sign yourself up for the duration of that episode or at least listening until you can’t anymore and you’re not sure whether you’re going to get the meet or what you really wanted out of that if you invest your time.

Where as what I’ve seen kind of happening is, especially in industries to where the listenership is really busy and let’s be honest, most of us are, but especially in kind of the business management and startup and all that kind of stuff, because everybody is just running around pulling their hair out, because they are so dang-on busy.

What I found works really well is two shorten the episodes to about 17 to 22 minutes in length, because that way, they’re not signing up for a 45 minute episode. They’re not like sitting down and you’ll notice some podcast do really well with three hour episodes and those are also very entertainment based podcasts, so it’s a totally different feel, because I’ve had that kick back a little bit, and when you’re doing a podcast to build relationships and kind of offer value especially in some like actionable type of areas.

I’ve found that short snippet style episodes, whether they’re short interviews or whether they’re, you know, go in depth in a very specific topic of 15 minutes works really well, because often times for people it’s a 20 minute, you know, they’ve got 20 minutes while they’re walking the dog, they’ve got 20 minutes while they are riding their bike around the park or whatever or while they are walking to lunch or something like that to where they’re not signing up for the long term and if they do have more time than that, then they can binge consumer your content and listen to multiple episodes.

Jason:

Okay, so we’ve gone almost double the 17 minute rule.

Ben:

We’re just getting so excited, you know?

Jason:

Yeah, you know, I’d love to see some stats, Ben, wouldn’t you on, I mean, of course there are some podcasting stats out there by Edison, I think is the name of the group that does them, but I love to know some stats about content orientated stuff like, how many, and this would be very hard to track, but how many shows have guests and how many are monologues or how many are multiple hosts and then I’d love to know the average length of a podcast in various categories. Wouldn’t that be cool to know? Like, the average entertainment podcast is an hour long, you know, the average business podcast is x. iTunes would know that for length, they already know. It would be great if they would share that.

Ben:

Yeah, that would be, really, really helpful and that is one area to where we are suffering quite a bit is in the tracking and statistics as far as podcasting goes.

Jason:

This industry is very young. It’s very young.

Ben:

It is.

Jason:

Not just length, but frequency of publishing on average versus ratings and there’s all kinds of stuff that I’m sure entrepreneurs will come up with over the years to come that will be really, really interesting to analyze, so good. Well, I like to ask guests like you, Ben, to give out any of your favorite websites or applications or tools that podcasters can use.

Ben:

Yeah, so there’s a couple that are really helpful one in particular is called Auphonic. Auphonic.com and it’s a tool that has been developed, they’ve got this freemium model, they just switched to a freemium model to where if you record your content, you can upload through their little tool and it will essentially remove some of the reverb. It will level the audio quality so you don’t have some really loud and some really quiet parts and you can even set it up to where it automatically inputs your intro and outro as well as ID3 tags to your file and adds your, you know, artwork. So it’s like, a one stop shop if you want to do podcasting in a very easy and very quick manner. Of course..

Jason:

So you can do that without an editor. Now, of course, that’s not going to take the ums and the ahs out or you know, just blatant mistakes, but it is like a poor man’s way to do editing, right?

Ben:

It’s beautiful, it’s beautiful. It’s the poor man’s editor and the click and dirty man’s editor I think is the more accurate, so that’s a really powerful tool for people I think.

Jason:

Yeah, thank you, that’s a good tool. Okay, what else?

Ben:

Other tools in the industry, you know, I’m a big fan of kind of the 80/20 approach, so you’ll see out there as far as podcasting goes, hundreds and hundreds of debates of this podcast or this podcast or microphone versus that microphone or this recording software versus that recording software.

Jason:

It can get really tedious and boring in that space, but yeah.

Ben:

Ugh, it makes me cry a little bit, but the, what I kind of advise for people who are just getting started is don’t get involved in any of those debates, because you’ll, you know, you’ll eyes will turn red, because you’re sick of staring and reading these treads. What I recommend is an ATR, Audio-Technica ATR2100 to get started. It’s cheap, it gets the job done. It’s USB. It plugs in, you don’t have to, like, mess with a whole bunch of stuff like sound boards and that kind of stuff, and of course this is just kind of to get people started so that this is not longer a hold up point and it’s no longer a hiccup point and using simple tools like Skype and Skype Call Recorder or Pamela is really all you need to get started. That’s it.

Jason:

Yeah. Good, good to know. Good stuff. Okay, well, Ben, give out your website and tell people a little bit about what they can find there.

Ben:

Yeah, so my website is AuthorityEngine.com and I’ve got my own podcast there as well as a weekly TV show and all geared towards helping small business owners, soloprenuers and personality-based businesses grow, market, and increase their sales using the power of podcast marketing. So, that’s what all of my content is about there and we actually have done for you services for podcasters who are specifically, you know, small business owners who want to launch a podcast for their business as well once you’re up and running and you don’t want to mess with all the post production stuff, we’ve got a very plug and play type of done for you service to make podcasting very easy for business owners and so that’s what you can find there and there’s also a couple of like really helpful guides there to help you get started if this space still looks like a bunch of question marks to you.

Jason:

Good stuff, good to know. Well, Ben Krueger, Authority Engine, thank you so much for joining us.

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