Corey Coates has edited both radio and podcasting shows for the last 10 years. He is also the owner of Podfly, a company that produces professional podcasts and provides audio editing services. Corey talks with Jason about the future of podcasting and how easy it is to make one-on-one connections with listeners through this up and coming medium.

Key Takeaways:
2:20 – Corey has been podcasting since 2006 and has worked with a lot of industry leaders in podcasting over the last 9 years.
4:20 – With podcasting you can target a very specific audience on your own terms.
7:50 – Overseas Radio Network had a regular radio stream of shows, but also had it available for download in case people wanted to listen to a specific show on their own time.
9:10 – Podcasting takes time and patience. Developing a good podcast is still best done organically and through word of mouth.
12:37 – You don’t need a large audience to be a successful podcaster.
15:50 – Audio equipment is so cheap and compact that you can literally record your show using GarageBand on your iPhone.
19:18 – Corey talks about the company Buzzsprout, who is looking at new ways to make podcasting easier.
23:45 – Corey talks a little bit about Podfly and how they help clients with the pre and post-production aspect of their podcast.
25:15 – Jason loves Podfly. He says that he is able to produce content faster than ever before because Podfly takes a load off his hands.
28:15 – Having a lot of content available on a regular basis is what builds a great audience.
29:15 – You can’t game the Apple iTunes system. Apple ranks you based on a number of downloads and the number of subscribers you have over a 4 week period.

 

Tweetables:
“When podcasters are thinking about their best practices, think about who your audience is and that you’re fighting for their time.”

“Podcasting is about engaging your listeners and how you don’t have to have a giant audience.”

“Podfly makes it easy for people to have their own podcast.”

 

Mentioned In This Episode:
http://www.podfly.net/
overseasradio.com/
http://www.libsyn.com/
http://www.buzzsprout.com/

 

Transcript: 

Jason Hartman:
Hey, it’s my pleasure to welcome Corey Coates, he is the founder of Podfly Productions. He’s got some good insights and tips and trends and best practices for podcasters. Just wanna hear from him about that. Corey, welcome, how you doing?

Corey Coates:
I’m great, Jason, thanks for having me.

Jason:
Good, good. My pleasure. You’re coming to us from beautiful Costa Rican paradise is that correct?

Corey:
I’m not actually in Costa Rica at the moment. I’m in Southern Illinois, I’m in the Unites States actually scoping out some future locations for our Podfly offices in the US.

Jason:
Good, good. I’m going to ask you about that in a few minutes and about your business and your business model too, but you deal with a lot of podcasters obviously in your business. You just have a lot of first hand experience and knowledge as to what’s working and what’s not working. I know you made a great recommendation, well you’ve made several great recommendations for me that I can use in my podcasting business and one of them was a really cool website theme and I just can’t wait to get that built out by our web development team and make that happen and, you know, you just have a lot of good best practice ideas, so tell us what you’re seeing out there, any best practices, any trends, I’ll just let you have it free form.

Corey:
Sure, I’ve been podcasting since about 2006. I was running an independent music podcast when this medium really came to fruition and I’ve really enjoyed and working with a lot of some of the industry leaders in podcasting over the last, I suppose, 8-9 years and watching this industry evolve and a lot of the folks I think coming from the terrestrial radio world now into the podcasting world is really what’s making the biggest difference.

People are finding what’s most effective, how to really engage, and more important, Jason, it’s getting to the point now where I think podcasting is gaining a level of credibility. It’s become a household world and that level of credibility means that there’s also a level of professionalism that is helping people deliver a message in a different and more intimate way to a boarder range of, you know, individuals who are more specifically are tuning in to a lot of these niche markets.

I’m sure you’re familiar with the concept of the long-tail..

Jason:
Oh yeah, yeah. Chris Anderson, I’m a huge fan of his work and he’s got three great books, but the long tail is one of them, yeah.

Corey:
Right, and when we look at, for example, the example Amazon book model and how book sales have completely been up-ended as a result of targeting these niche markets, the same thing is happening now with audio content as well. Now, we can find those 10,000 individuals who are extremely interested in what we have to say on a very specific topic as oppose to trying to fight for that shelf space, if you will, and get in front of a million people and hope that 10,000 people are going to relate to it. Of course, gatekeeper is now taken out of the equation as well. We have the power in our hands to independently broadcast our message and directly market to and engage our listeners.

Jason:
Right, we do, we do, and the long tail is such a critical element because when you look at the now soon to be old-school of talk radio. I was a big talk radio listener for many, many years, and, you know, it’s just so random. I mean, the topics are not necessarily related to what I wanted to hear, what I was looking for, and you got so many commercials. I mean, it’s just, you only get 38 to 42 minutes per 60 minute hour of actual content. So, podcasting it’s just a better medium. It’s really narrowcasting to a much more engaged and enthusiastic audience.

Corey:
Well, absolutely. I mean, like I came from the terrestrial radio world. I’ve done some commercial production for a bunch of AM and FM stations in the past back in Toronto, Canada and that surrounding area. I know the market and I understand it quite well. I understand the model very well and it had been successful for about a century, but the reality now trying to constrict content to a show clock, squeezing in as much commercial time as possible, and then what’s worse trying to broadcast it from this sort of soap box to anybody who might happen by it on the dial is just an ineffective way of targeting listeners.

Jason:
It really is and the other thing about it is, you know, there’s the concept of the shock jock, right, we’ve all heard of shock jocks and when you look at AM talk radio, that’s really, I mean, I don’t blame them, that’s what they need to be to get the listeners because you’ve got to catch people just as they’re channeling surfing where as podcast consumers are much more deliberate. It is, it’s a much better model, no question about it. I think when it really gets wide spread adoption into the dashboard of the audio mobile, it is going to be huge. I mean, we’re at the beginning of the podcast revolution, if you ask me.

Corey:
There’s no question. I mean, you mentioned getting into the dashboard, I was speaking to some of the folks over a Stitcher Radio and these guys are one of the biggest up and comers. You know, iTunes is obviously the Goliath in the industry still today as a podcast agitator, but Stitcher is really making waves in how they’re delivering this content and how they’re marketing their product.

More overly, just recently closed a deal with Ford Motor Company where Stitcher is now going to be a component, Sitcher Radio that is, in these Ford cars, so people will be able to get in, log into their Stitcher account, and have all their favorite podcasts right there in their car just as they would in radio stations, so it’s that accessibility to the general public is the next step we need to get over. You know, my mother understand that I have podcasts and she understands that I do this..

Jason:
She doesn’t know how to get to one, though.

Corey:
Yeah, I mean, she’s not going to iTunes and subscribe and sync it with her phone. She still goes to the website and hits the play button, so she imagines I have an internet radio show. So really the next hurdle for us to get over technologically is like what Stitcher Radio is doing and that’s kind of making it accessible in an appliance sense less than a technology sense.

Jason:
Right, right, that’s a good distinction, the appliance sense. The radio is just an appliance, right, rather than oh, I gotta go in to this app and I gotta find it and do all this kind of stuff. One of the things that I also thought that would be kind of interesting and we both know Kerry Lutz, right, so Kerry, who has the Financial Survival Network and I’ve been on that show many times, he really believes and I don’t know if he’s right or not, but he really believes that people don’t want to think too much about it. They just want it to be streaming. I don’t know kind of how we reconcile that with a concept of long tail and people finding what they want. You know, is it that or is it turn the button and content is playing, you know? I’m not sure.

Corey:
I understand. I was working most recently a company called Overseas Radio Network and they had really a dual-prong approach. That being, there was always a streaming station of their content, so people could tune in and just have this sort of passive experience, this ambient radio going of all of this content, but they could always drill down to specific shows and subscribe and listen to on their own time in their own way.

So, we’re seeing a lot more podcast networks are going in this direction. Having a stream going full time people can listen to and just, you know, catch everything and anything that’s coming through that production house and if they find something that they really like they can go ahead and just grab that particular show and make it that main stay in their phone or in their computer or what have you.

Jason:
Yeah, very interesting. Okay, so what are some of the best things podcasters can do now? Say someone listening is already podcasting, there’s certainly a podcast consumer because they’re listening, but say they’re already podcasting, you know, they’re doing some stuff, they’re gaining an audience, they’ve got some traction. You know, how can they really optimize more and what should they be planning for in the future? I think they should plan for a bigger audience, number one, and we’ve talked about that, but you know, just any best practices.

Corey:
There’s a combination of things. Number one is patience. Growing a podcast audience takes time, even the best marketed podcasts out there will still take time into the ears of the listeners that you’re trying to reach. Podcasting is still best marketed organically. The majority of podcasts that I even personally listen to, and I listen to dozens of them every week, are ones that are recommended to me by friends. Very rarely do I go out and see particular content in a podcast, because there’s just such a enormous seed, so that requires patience on the part of the podcaster to wait for…if you’re giving out good content to get it out there, you know, there’s folks in the industry who say there’s an 80/20 rule.

You should spend, you know, 80% of your time marketing your podcast and 20% of your time producing your podcast. I’m of the camp that is an inverse relationship. It really should be 80% should be focused on creating great content and 20% on marketing that content because great content is king. That is what the message will be for people ultimately. That’s what people will talk about and that’s what will win the time of the podcaster.

There seems to be within the industry today as it’s growing, folk thinking I need to some how get myself into the highest rankings of all of these directories ergo I’ll be popular. The reality is, and I wanna make a specific example if I could, I was just speaking to my girlfriend recently to see how many podcasts she has on her phone today and it’s only ever four or five that she regularly subscribes to.

You know, one of them of course is always Radio Lab, another one is This Is American Life, she’s listening a lot to You’re Not So Smart, but the other two is a yoga podcast and I think a Buddhist podcast. It’s really until, for example, that yoga podcast started to suck enough that she doesn’t want to listen to it anymore that she’s going to go to a directory and seek it out.

But even in this case, and this is actually statistically proven, because there’s some really good studies that came out in this medium that demonstrated when people are seeking out content they very rarely go to a directory to find what they’re looking for. They’re going to pull people on Facebook, they’re going to find their Twitter friends and say, “Hey, I’m looking for a good new yoga podcast, does anyone have any good recommendations?”

I think for a lot of the podcasters, when they’re thinking about those best practices is to consider who your audience is and that you’re fighting for their time. So, going back to my original example, she only has four to five hours a week that she’s going to afford to even listen to podcasts in the first place. So, what you’re not really doing is you’re not fighting the top 20 yoga podcasts out there, you’re fighting for that 45 minutes a week that your listener has to give to you and that requires patience.

Jason:
Yeah, it definitely does. What is your thought, I kind of thought that’s what you were going to say is you were going to address the idea of the audience size and not being totally hypnotized by that. You kind of came at the from an angle, so you know, I mean, that’s the point that maybe I wanna get across and I think you’re going to agree with me is that it’s really about the engagement of your listeners and you don’t have to have a giant audience. That’s really the broadcast mentality a lot of podcasters have adopted, right?

You know, we’re KFI, we’re the number one AM radio station, 50,000 watts, blah blah blah, but you don’t need that. There’s a good old quote that I’ve always like, Corey, and it goes something like this, I’m probably going to butcher it, but it says, “One person with a commitment is better than 1,000 people who are just interested.” You know? I think that’s the thing with our listeners.

Corey:
100% agree. You know, I try and put this in real terms for a lot of the folks that I work with and that is, if you only have 500 people a week downloading your show, a lot of people kind of think that’s such a low number, maybe this isn’t worth doing, but here’s the reality, Jason, if you put it in real terms, physical terms, if you got 500 people every week to get into a room and listen to you 45 minutes, you’re kicking butt, you’re doing something right.

Jason:
Holy. Of course, you’re on your way to becoming Tony Robbins, you know?

Corey:
That’s right. So, a lot of folks who are thinking, “Oh, I need 10,000 daily subscribers to my show and I need to put all this content out.” We do, we get hypnotized into this idea that, “Well, I better put out three to five shows a week so my numbers are big.” But, this mentality is one that is antiquated in how we might approach an advertising firm. If we’re looking to monetize our podcast, we can say, “Here’s our demographic, we have 50,000 regular subscribers and I wanna sell some ad space on my podcast.” That’s not the point of podcasting, that’s the point of radio. So, we have to remember that this is a completely different medium and that a small audience size is actually a dedicated and intimate audience size and that’s the point, that’s what we’re shooting for.

Jason:
You know, I can hardly wait for the day when we cam tell how many people are actually listening, not just downloading. You know? It’s always download rather than actual listens.

Corey:
Well, it’s the same thing. It comes from the web world as well, people wanna know how many uniques does your site get and I really don’t know if it matters or if I care. If I’m not selling banner ads or affiliate links, the reality is how many people are reading my content or are interested in what I have to say and more importantly now, it’s not the radio format we’re on that soap box and we’re broadcasting information and hoping people are interested in it.

It’s now an engagement. It’s finding a way to create an intimacy with our listener and making us more relate-able to them and that’s the whole purpose of podcasting. We’re literally in the ear of the listener and we’re able to create that relationship, we start building trust, we start building credibility, and we start building that level of engagement that we couldn’t do with a more one way conversation as with the past.

Jason:
Okay, so you know, there’s a lot of technology out there and it’s really easy to be distracted by it and you know, we get this sort of flavor of the month and today’s world the flavor of the hour concept where, “Oh, I gotta download this new app.” Or “Join this social network.” You know, just give us a couple of tools you see podcasters using successfully.

Corey:
From the consumption end or the creation end?

Jason:
Probably the creation end or the distribution end.

Corey:
Sure, I’m actually on a microphone right now. I’m on this Apogee 96k mic.

Jason:
Yeah, the one I’m on too. You told me to buy it. *Laughter*.

Corey:
It’s a great little microphone and it’s compact. It’s got a little lightening cable that plugs into an iPhone or iPad. It sounds phenomenal and it’s ultra portable, so we’re finding the technology itself now is getting much more compact, a lot more compatible with everything and a lot easier to us, so nowadays it’s as easy as just having GarageBand on your iPhone, plugging in this microphone, getting on the road, and you can go ahead and do your show. It’s no longer that you need a mixing desks, multiple microphones, and two days of consultations to getting everything setup.

Any individual with iPad or a laptop can just plugin and go, so we’re finding that the technology is more compact and a lot more affordable and the professional quality is a lot higher. So, there’s an example right there. I’m using a particular mic that, you know, 10 years ago would have been a joke in broadcasting, but it’s completely acceptable and I know it’s being used by professional voice over artists. I think that’s number one.

I know a lot of people are starting to move away from some of the big dogs in podcasting and looking at taking control over their feed. They’re some great services, but there are up and comers as well. I’ve been talking to the folks over at a company called Buzzsprout who have as many, if not more, clients than the Goliath Libsyn these days.

These up and comers are looking at podcasting from a completely different approach as to how to make it easier and more user friendly on the front end so that anybody can get their message out there. It’s really, it’s almost two-three years behind blogging and web platforms. As you knew, 10 years ago to have a sophisticated with good content and well maintained required at least a web developer, a designer, a whole lot of people, but now a days we can log in to something like Squarespace or Wix and slap together a website that is absolutely gorgeous, super professional and it’s hands-off.

So, where podcasting I think is going is where web development was a couple of years ago. We’re really starting to get our footing in the technology and make it a lot more accessible to the general public, because there’s still a barrier to entry to really interesting individuals who have incredible messages to deliver, it’s just the technology is a little too intimidating for them, but we’re starting to see that rapidly change.

Jason:
It’s getting a lot easier, a lot easier. So, tell us about Buzzsprout and like what’s their different take? You know, Libsyn is huge. Most podcasters know about Libsyn if they don’t use it already, but what’s the concept of Buzzsprout?

Corey:
Buzzsprout is going to have a similar approach. It sounds like, I understand they have upwards of 10,000 shows right now that they’re hosting, which, to me, is absolutely incredible, but what they’re looking at doing more integration in the front-end and production side of things. We’re seeing things like companies like Auphonic that are doing web-based audio processing. Leveling things out, smoothing things, compressing them, making them sound better. Things that were usually the domain of an audio editor are becoming accessible.

Again, if you wanna think in terms of photo editing, it’s almost the same idea. Photoshop is this enormous bloated program that’s terrible intimidating and it takes you 6 months to get good at it.

Jason:
And I’ve never learned it. I only wished I knew how to use it.

Corey:
I just don’t think I’m going to live long enough to even bother to tell you the truth, but we now..

Jason:
If I could use photo and Audacity and Final Cut Pro, I would feel like a genius.

Corey:
Oh, you’re telling me.

Jason:
And make my own WordPress, I would love that.

Corey:
What we’re seeing now a lot of these types of services are becoming web based even like great photo filters and editing is available on everything from Instagram to your Google+ to everything else, so it’s finding a way to make this accessible. When I was speaking to the good folks over at Buzzsprout, this is the direction that they’re really looking at taking it, because they’re not thinking about how to compete with services that are out there today, they’re really looking at what they can do to advance the medium in the next 3-4-5 years.

Doing that really means we’ve got to get in front of the podcast. There’s still an issue with a combination of we find, in our industry, two thing. Number one, the pre-production, the physical equipment and the use of that equipment is still not up to par. It could be a lot more professional and people need a lot more people and the second thing, Jason, and this is a little off topic, but at the end of the day, if you’re not particularly an interesting individual, it’s really absurd to think you’re going to have an interesting podcast.

That’s really what it boils down to for a lot of folks. They’re not successful largely because they’re not generally talented. They really don’t have anything interesting to say. If you’re not a good conversationalist, what makes you think people will want to listen when you have a conversation. If you are not a particularly good speaker, why would you want to speak to somebody for 45 minutes and expect them to care what you’re saying? So, I think it’s a combination of those two things.

It’s still content is king. If you’re not talented and it’s not well produced, it’s not going to do well.

Jason:
Yeah, very good points. Very good points. You know, one of the things I’ve been having this very small debate with my friend and coach AJ Amax(#20:30?) He’s been on the show before. I said to him, I made a prediction, I said, “One day, I think everybody will have a podcast.” He thinks I’m nuts for saying that. But here’s what I mean by it, I don’t mean that everyone will have a podcast in the way we think of it today, but since a podcast, Corey, is really nothing more than an audio blog or a video blog, you know, there are video podcasts, although it’s the less popular medium; look how people all have a Facebook page nowadays, I mean, not everybody of course, 1 and half billion people or whatever the latest number is from Facebook, right. So, I think that’s pretty much going to become true with podcasting.

Everyone is going to have a video or an audio feed as part of just their social profiles. Of course, you can stick this stuff on Facebook now, we all know that, but it’s going to work it’s way in in sort of a different format to where when you just want to know about it, you know, what your buddy is up to, you’re just going to be able to go and listen to their latest audio message, you know. It’s going to be a way for people to communicate asynchronously from one to many.

Now, we communicate asynchronously now through email, text, voice messages, voice mail machines, and so forth, and for messaging through apps and such and now the iPhone has it through text, which is fantastic, but this would be the one to many format. It’s not like they’re all necessarily have a big audience, maybe the average Facebook user has a 150 friends, for example, it’ll be like that. We you wanna, “Hey, what’s up with Jason? Let’s just listen to his latest message.”

Corey:
I would agree. A lot of people are looking for a hub. They’re looking for a directory and here’s the good thing still about broadcast media is that despite the fact there’s a gatekeeper between you and your audience, it’s still pruned. It’s still produced. Things don’t get on television, don’t get on radio, unless they’re good.

There has to be quality and the social component that’s possible with what you’re speaking of is that it would be socially pruned. Those things that are liked, those things that are shared, those things that are commented on, those are the things that will populate and bubble up to the surface, so I can absolutely see your vision of that.

There’s still a hub, a Facebook of podcasting, if you will, that will people will go to, but still only the best content will be visible unless you’re actually drilling down and looking for it, because at the end of the day, people still need that content to be messaged and handled and given to them in a professional package to make it consumable.

You know, it’s really with YouTube it’s a great example. You can scream into YouTube all day and if it’s terrible what you’re saying and it’s really produced, you’re going to have 3 viewers and one of them is you where as if you’re doing something that’s interesting and compelling and well produced, people are going to like it. People are going to share it, people are going to see it, and it’s just naturally, you know, bubble up to the surface.

Jason:
Yep, makes complete sense. Well, tell us a little bit about what you do at Podfly.

Corey:
Podfly Productions is a podcast production company is really what we’re doing is we’re making it easy for people to have their own podcast. We’re working with a lot of people who are either hobbyists, entrepreneurs, business people, who wanna add another layer to their message. They usually have a professional website and a blog and a newsletter and podcasting is the latest thing. It’s something that they want to do to engage their clientele and customers directly and add a little bit of credibility to what they’re doing with the industry. It’s a quick way to raise your authority level, if you will, by having conversations with people who are also authorities in particular fields.

So, what we’re really doing, we’re providing the pre and post-production services so that individuals can focus fully on their content, booking their guests, and producing great shows. We’ll worry about all the dirty work. We’ll do all the editing, get your intro together, make you sound professional, get you into the hosting site, get you posted up on the web, put you into iTunes. All of the little nitty gritty things that need to be done to have a podcast and maintain it. People simple don’t have either the savvy or the time to do.

Jason:
Yeah, no question about it. I tell you, Corey, you have been bugging me for a couple of years to come over and take advantage of Podfly services and I did that just recently and I gotta tell you, I love it. You’re doing a great job. It’s really so much easier to un-fragment, if you will, all these little different components of the business from, you know, getting an image on the WordPress site to editing the podcast and doing the transcription.

What we’re doing now is a nice best practice that I’ve been recommending for a while and originally kind of copied the idea from Tucker Max, the infamous Tucker Max. *Laughter*. He’s got a podcast. He’s got a well done professional website as you’d expect. I mean, he’s a big celebrity.

You know, I call these enhanced show notes. So what you’re doing, you’re team will edit my podcast, transcribe my podcast for all of the podcasts for Hartman media network, you know, what have we got? Like 20 shows. Well, if you take out the video, we don’t have that many, but with video podcasts, and doing all of that, you know, it just all goes up at once where it used to be where I had to wait for the transciptionists after the show was published and you know I had to deal with a graphic designer and say, “Hey, let’s get a better image up there.”

You know, it was just this really discombobulated thing and it’s become a lot more stream lined. We’re getting a lot more content out to the audience, which I really like, because I think one of the things you want to do as long as you have good content is you wanna offer a lot of content, because in doing that, you know, if there audience likes you, fill up their time with your content. Why not? If you don’t, somebody else will. *Laughter*. You know? So, this has just allowed us to get a lot more content out there, so I appreciate it.

Corey:
Well, it’s funny you mention best practices as well because one of the biggest recommendations for a lot of our clientele is we sign our clients on monthly packages that really encourages them to have consistent release schedules. This is key. If you don’t release a podcast for 2-3 weeks it is not unreasonable to think you’re going to lose your audience and much of it and you have to rebuild it for a number of reasons.

Number one, the podcast agitators, such as iTunes, is going to automatically stop downloading because it sees you’ve stopped listening and two if I don’t get my dose of my favorite show on Tuesday for two weeks in a row, we’re creatures of habit and we move on. It gets to the point where I’m not going to seek out this content any further, so you’re right, having a lot of medium available on a very consistent basis is what builds an audience, plain and simple.

Jason:
No question about it. So many of my listeners over the years have told me, if you would just publish on a regular date, like, literally, and they’ve said this to me, I would be waiting if it was every Wednesday, I would be waiting for your new episode every Wednesday. You know, we’ve been doing this for a long time, seven years now, we have not always been very consistent, so I think you’re right and I’ve noticed already the ratings are coming back a bit as we’ve been more consistent, publishing more content, so I couldn’t agree more. That’s a good thing.

Do you wanna before you go, Corey, and I know you’ve got to run, address anything about, you know, when you look at iTunes new and noteworthy section or in the What’s Hot section or anything like that? How to do that? You know, we made the disclaimer about rankings, but let’s go back to rankings. *Laughter*.

Corey:
Sure, I mean, look, at the end of the day, if you are in the top 20 in iTunes you’ve got it made. You’re golden because you’re so much more discoverable, especially as we’ve seen recently like iOS just updated iOS 8. They made podcasts, you know, a native application on the iPhone. This is in front of my mom now like it’s never been and she’s only going to see those top 20. She’s going to go, “What are podcasts?” and she’s going to flip through them and look by category and she’s going to subscribe to the ones that are in the top 20.

So, there’s a lot of buzz in the industry about how to get up into that ranking and there really is no way of gaming the system, okay. The Apple formula is really straight forward. It’s based on the number of downloads over a four week period and then from there it’s also the number of subscribers. It has nothing to do with and, I have evidence of this, it has nothing to do with your ratings. It has everything to do with how many downloads over a period of time and how many people subscriber to the podcast. That’s what makes something new and noteworthy. If you have a consistent download rate and growth rate and subscriber rate, you’re going to stay up in that top 20. Plain and simple.

Jason:
Yeah, good, good stuff. Alright. Well, give out your website and tell people where they can find out more.

Corey:
People can head to Podfly.net and find out about me and our services and you can get on to our Twitter account, our Facebook, and engage us directly that way.

Jason:
Good stuff. Corey, thank you so much for joining us today.

Corey:

Always a pleasure.